Seattle chocolate shop fires employee who denied service to police officers

A Seattle chocolate shop has fired an employee who denied service to police officers.

“We work to advance diversity and inclusion at our business, and for our team members to follow their passions and to be engaged in the critical issues we face as a city, and a nation,” Chocolati owner Christian Wong wrote in a statement last week[1]. “However, our team members cannot decide which customers to serve based on their own personal political beliefs. This simply is not an acceptable practice at our business.”

“It was in the best interests of both parties to part ways with the team member,” he added.

The statement comes after members of the Seattle Police Department revealed they were denied service when they attempted to purchase items in the shop.

“No, I won’t serve you,” one of the uniformed police officers, accompanied by a trainee, was told by an employee after attempting to make a purchase.

MULTIPLE POLICE OFFICERS REPORTEDLY REFUSED SERVICE AT SEATTLE CHOCOLATE SHOP: ‘NO, I WON’T SERVE YOU’[2]

A third officer also said he faced a similar experience at the chocolate shop.

The president of the Seattle Police Officers Guild, Mike Solan[3], said the officers were met with “a bit of hostility,” but he lauded the public for its support of police following reports on the matter.

“But based upon the amount of pushback that company has received from the public and across the nation is that people are still really supportive of the police,” Solan said.

Wong added in his statement that he plans to meet with an officer who was denied service to “personally apologize — just as I would apologize to any customer who was refused service on the basis of an employee’s personal views.”

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER[4]

The incident comes amid a rising anti-police climate across the nation after several recent shootings of black people by police and high-profile public figures demanding that law enforcement officers be held accountable[5].

Seattle, specifically, is also facing a “staffing crisis beyond mitigation,” according to interim police Chief Adrian Diaz.