NYC education department: No more snow days next school year

New York City[1] students will not get “snow days” off during the next academic year.

Instead of canceling instruction, schools will continue classes via remote learning methods, the city’s Department of Education said in an announcement accompanying the calendar showing other changes for the 2021-2022 academic year.

“On ‘Snow days’ or days when school buildings are closed due to an emergency, all students and families should plan on participating in remote learning,” the department said[2] on its website.

NYC SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR CALLS FOR END TO ELITE HIGH SCHOOL EXAM AFTER ASIANS DOMINATE TEST SCORES[5]

“The DOE will shift all students to remote instruction in lieu of cancelling schools due to severe weather conditions,” the department said[6] in a statement to CNN, adding that the pandemic “created the ability to switch seamlessly to remote learning, and DOE central and schools have distributed hundreds of thousands of devices to ensure that learning can continue remotely during school closures.”

Election Day 2021[7], which falls on Nov. 2, will also be a fully remote, asynchronous instructional day for students, the department announced.

In addition, public school[8] students will be off in observance of two new holidays: Indigenous Peoples’ Day on Oct. 11, recognized by the federal government as Columbus Day, and for Juneteenth[9] on June 20.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER[10]

The Washington Examiner could not immediately reach the city’s Department of Education[11] for comment.

References

  1. ^ New York City (www.washingtonexaminer.com)
  2. ^ said (www.schools.nyc.gov)
  3. ^ https://t.co/xKxC3fwldy (t.co)
  4. ^ May 4, 2021 (twitter.com)
  5. ^ NYC SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR CALLS FOR END TO ELITE HIGH SCHOOL EXAM AFTER ASIANS DOMINATE TEST SCORES (www.washingtonexaminer.com)
  6. ^ said (www.cnn.com)
  7. ^ Election Day 2021 (www.washingtonexaminer.com)
  8. ^ public school (www.washingtonexaminer.com)
  9. ^ Juneteenth (www.washingtonexaminer.com)
  10. ^ CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER (www.washingtonexaminer.com)
  11. ^ Department of Education (www.washingtonexaminer.com)