Video Shows Highly Venomous Snake Swimming in Family’s Pool

One of the most dangerous venomous snakes in the world has been found in a family’s swimming pool.

The eastern brown snake, which is native to eastern and central Australia, is responsible for more human fatalities in the country than any other species of snake.

In a video captured by Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers 24/7, a company that offers snake removal services in Queensland, Australia, the small and slender predator can be seen swimming gracefully around a pool, undulating and darting through the water.

It initially manages to evade capture by snake-catcher Stu, who suspects that it had fallen into the pool accidentally, and was struggling to climb out because of its high walls.

However, after an attempted escape through a drain, the snake-catcher manages to scoop the animal out of the water.

“A family in Palmwoods got a surprise when as they hopped into the pool they noticed that something had already beaten them in there,” Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers 24/7 wrote in a post on Facebook.

“It was a stunning orange coloured Eastern Brown Snake. It had most likely been cruising through the yard and accidentally fallen into the pool and couldn’t get out.”

The eastern brown snake is commonly spotted in the vicinity of people’s homes. Last month, a family in Marino, Adelaide, found an eastern brown snake swimming in their pool, and another family found one tangled in netting in their backyard.

“They are regarded as one of the most venomous snakes in the world, in fact they are the 2nd most toxic land snake in the world,” reads a description of the snake on the Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers 24/7 website.

“A bite from this can and will cause death if not treated correctly. Bites from this species have caused human fatalities. The Eastern Brown Snake accounts for more fatalities than any other Australian Snake.”

When threatened, eastern brown snake will retreat if they’re able to, but attack if they feel cornered.

“They have one of the most impressive defensive displays out of all snakes. Bites from this species should be treated immediately and attended to with correct first aid.”

Upon closer inspection, a lump close to the animal’s tail indicated an injury, which Stu suspected to be a broken vertebra. It isn’t clear how the injury was sustained, or if it led to the snake falling into the pool.

“We met up with the Australia Zoo Rescue team and they took it back to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital for assessment,” Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers 24/7 wrote.

An Eastern Brown Snake in Australia
A stock image shows an Eastern Brown Snake, unrelated to the animal that was involved in the incident. The highly venomous predator was found swimming in a family’s pool.
iStock