Cornyn, Cruz join GOP colleagues in successful acquittal of Trump

WASHINGTON — Texas’ two Republican senators, John Cornyn and Ted Cruz, joined with most of their GOP colleagues on Saturday to successfully acquit former President Donald Trump of an impeachment charge that accused him of inciting the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. While Republicans were successful in holding the line for a president who left office nearly a month ago, a majority of the Senate voted to convict the president. In all, seven GOP Senators joined with 50 Democrats in a guilty vote against Trump. That sum fell short of a conviction, as a two-thirds majority is needed for a guilty verdict. The impetus for Democrats and some Republicans to push for Trump’s conviction after he left

Read More

TribCast: Ken Paxton’s legal woes continue

Quality journalism doesn’t come free Perhaps it goes without saying — but producing quality journalism isn’t cheap. At a time when newsroom resources and revenue across the country are declining, The Texas Tribune remains committed to sustaining our mission: creating a more engaged and informed Texas with every story we cover, every event we convene and every newsletter we send. As a nonprofit newsroom, we rely on members to help keep our stories free and our events open to the public. Do you value our journalism? Show us with your support. Yes, I’ll donate today

Read More

Gov. Greg Abbott issues statewide disaster declaration due to “severe winter weather”

Gov. Greg Abbott issued a disaster declaration Friday afternoon for every county in Texas as a massive winter storm enveloped the state. The Texas Division of Emergency Management is deploying resources to help local response efforts, according to a press release. Abbott has also ordered the Texas State Operations Center to expand its operations to 24-hours a day until the end of next week. “Texas should heed the guidance of their local leaders and stay alert to changing weather conditions in their area,” Abbott said in the release. “These resources will help us respond to this severe winter weather and keep our communities safe.” The order comes as the National Weather Service issued winter storm warnings or watches for most

Read More

Latest census delay will push Texas’ redrawing of political maps into the fall

Sign up for The Brief, our daily newsletter that keeps readers up to speed on the most essential Texas news. Texas lawmakers will almost certainly be back for a rare special legislative session in the fall now that the U.S. Census Bureau has set a September deadline for releasing the 2020 census results. Facing significant holdups in finalizing the decennial count, the bureau announced Friday that the detailed population numbers needed to redraw legislative and congressional districts to reflect the state’s growth in the last decade will be delivered by Sept. 30, a monthslong delay that could upend the next set of elections for seats from Congress down to local offices. The bureau’s original plan was to get the data

Read More

Austin Police Chief Brian Manley retiring months after council members called for his removal

Austin Police Chief Brian Manley is retiring, the city manager told city leadership in a memo Friday. He will be leaving his post at the end of March after 30 years with the department and a growing call for his firing from City Council and community members. Manley has been at the helm of the police department since 2016, first as an interim chief and then appointed permanently to the job by City Manager Spencer Cronk two years later. During that time, he was praised for his efforts to stop the serial Austin bombings in 2018. But more recently, Manley has faced harsh criticism, largely spurred by the police killing of an unarmed man last year and how the department

Read More

Many Texas students can skip STAAR tests this year, but high schoolers might have to show up to graduate

Need to stay updated on coronavirus news in Texas? Our evening roundup will help you stay on top of the day’s latest updates. Sign up here. Parents of Texas elementary and middle schoolers in virtual learning who don’t want their children sitting for in-person standardized tests this school year have a simple option: They can keep their kids home with no ill effect. But for some high schoolers, whose test results still determine whether they graduate, there may be no way to get around showing up for testing sessions in person. State education officials confirmed recently that all public school students will be required to take the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness, or STAAR exams, in person at

Read More

Migrants in “remain in Mexico” program will soon be allowed to enter the United States, federal agency says

EL PASO – Tens of thousands of asylum seekers who have been forced to wait in Mexico under a Trump-era immigration policy will soon be able to enter the United States to pursue their cases, the Biden administration announced Friday. Launched by the Trump administration, the Migrant Protection Protocols forced asylum seekers to wait in Mexico border towns for their hearings in American courtrooms. The Department of Homeland Security said in a statement that about 25,000 migrants in the program have active cases. More than 70,000 migrants have been placed into the program since it was announced in late 2018, including more than 20,000 in the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez area. Officials in Mexico have said that many migrants have since

Read More

“Crisis upon crisis”: Industrial pollutants leave San Angelo residents without water as winter storm bears down

Sign up for The Brief, our daily newsletter that keeps readers up to speed on the most essential Texas news. Residents of San Angelo, a West Texas city in the Concho Valley, have gone days without safe drinking water after city officials discovered industrial chemicals contaminated the water system. The crisis — which stretches into at least its fifth day Friday — in the city of 101,000 people has left residents frustrated and scared after the city told them Monday night to cease all uses of water other than flushing their toilets. They were also told that first boiling the water before use would not make it usable and, instead, only more dangerous. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality found

Read More

Texas launches multimillion dollar campaign to combat vaccine hesitancy

Snappy music opens the 15-second video featuring a diverse bunch of Texans getting their shots at a COVID-19 vaccination site. The ad ends with a Black woman imploring her peers to “do it for yourself, do it for your family, do it for your community.” Then she feigns shooting a basketball through a hoop with her hands. “Take the shot!” Another video released this week features vaccinated Texans over 65 talking about seeing their grandchildren again. The ads, developed by the Texas Department of Health Services and released in the past week, are the first in a $2.3 million public awareness campaign being launched by the state to increase acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine and inform the public on how

Read More

Analysis: A Star-Spangled culture war in Texas

Editor’s note: If you’d like an email notice whenever we publish Ross Ramsey’s column, click here. If you would like to listen to the column, just click on the play button below. The politician who championed the “bathroom bill” in the Texas Legislature in 2017 is now singing “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick unfurled the first of his priority bills this week, in reaction to news that the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks had stopped playing the national anthem before home games. That went on for 13 games before anyone noticed, according to The Athletic. But when they noticed, they really noticed. The news traveled all the way to the lieutenant governor, and before you could say “dawn’s early light,”

Read More

1 2 3 8