Coronavirus pandemic has caused food insecurity in Massachusetts to soar

Even as more people get vaccines, many still don’t know where their next meal is coming from, especially in Eastern Massachusetts. Food insecurity has soared by 66% since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, and by 117% among children, according to the Greater Boston Food Bank. “There’s no vaccine for hunger,” said Catherine Drennan, a food bank spokeswoman. Overall, the state has seen a 59% increase in food insecurity, meaning one in eight people are unsure how they will get their next meal, Drennan said. Eastern Massachusetts has been particularly hard hit, leaving one in five children food insecure, she said. “When people are vaccinated, our work is not anywhere near done,” said Stephanie Tyler Smith, program director at Food

Read More

Battenfeld: Charlie Baker faces grandstanding lawmakers in test of political muscle

Gov. Charlie Baker faces grandstanding lawmakers on Thursday hours after he bowed to public and political pressure, releasing more coronavirus vaccines to hospitals and millions of dollars to an initiative to provide more equity to underserved communities. Baker must testify before a joint legislative committee and is expected to get tough questions about the state’s balky vaccine roll out program. It will be a test of the Legislature’s muscle and willingness to take on Baker, who has mostly gotten kid gloves treatment from legislative leaders for most of his two terms. Baker’s reversal on vaccine supply on Wednesday, giving thousands more doses to local hospitals, was a tacit admission that what he was doing to vaccinate Massachusetts residents wasn’t enough.

Read More

Military needs “honest reckoning” over racism in its ranks, says Black veteran

A United States Army veteran says the military has to have an “honest reckoning” with systemic racism that historians say has been pervasive within its ranks since its inception. Black Veterans Project executive director Richard Brookshire said Wednesday on CBSN, “We have seen the military tackle something like gays being able to serve openly, and the witch hunt that was ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,’ and the ruining of careers around ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.’ So we know they have the capacity” to address the issue of white nationalism. Black service members account for 17% of active duty personnel. More than half of minority service members say they have seen white nationalism or racism among fellow troops, according to the Black Veterans

Read More

Rescue animals offer comfort to children with disabilities

Last Updated Feb 24, 2021 7:18 PM EST Leander, Texas — Some superheroes need a sidekick. For 5-year-old Harper, it’s Halo, a white fluffy dog with one leg and an unlimited supply of love.  “She has lucky fins like me,” Harper said of Halo’s superpower. Harper’s superpower is her hand that formed differently. She calls it her lucky fin.  Every week, Harper visits a rescue animal sanctuary outside Austin to check in on her fellow superheroes.  Harper with her dog friend Halo.  CBS News “I have not only four dogs in wheelchairs but a cow in a wheelchair and a lamb in a wheelchair,” said Jamie Wallace Griner, who cares for more than 160 animals with disabilities who were left

Read More

Drunken driving charge against Bruce Springsteen dropped

The government dropped drunken driving and reckless driving charges against Bruce Springsteen on Wednesday stemming from an incident in November, admitting that the rocker’s blood-alcohol level was so low that it didn’t warrant the charges. Springsteen pleaded guilty to a third charge, consuming alcohol in a closed area, the Gateway National Recreation Area. Better known as Sandy Hook, it is an Atlantic Ocean peninsula with views of the New York City skyline. Facing a judge and more than 100 onlookers in a video conference, Springsteen sat next to lawyer Mitchell Ansell and admitted he was aware it was illegal to consume alcohol at the park. Rock star Bruce Springsteen (bottom R) appears in an online remote arraignment before U.S. District

Read More

No charges expected in Tiger Woods crash

No criminal charges are expected in relation to the Tuesday car crash that injured Tiger Woods, Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva announced Wednesday. Woods underwent emergency surgery after suffering serious injuries to his legs in the crash. “We don’t contemplate any charges whatsoever in this crash,” Villanueva said at a press conference.  While coming around a curve in the road, Woods’ vehicle struck the median and then crossed over into oncoming traffic, Villanueva said. The SUV then hit the curb and began to roll over before eventually coming to a stop in an embankment about 30 yards away from the road. Villanueva said the 45-year-old golf icon could still be hit with driving infractions based on what the traffic

Read More

Second-half schedule has a friendlier home flavor for Celtics

Brad Stevens was tired of a few things by the time Wednesday night’s game in Atlanta came around, but mostly, the repeated problems that led to a sub-.500 (15-16) record. So when the NBA announced the second-half schedule on Wednesday, and despite having seen the Celtics’ portion three days ago, the Celtics coach had no time for looking ahead. “The schedule I got three days ago and I’ve looked at it once. I’m getting peppered with questions about travel and game time, all kinds of stuff,” Stevens said, showing a touch of exasperation. “Like, I’m just trying to figure out how to guard Luka Doncic and Trae Young. Somebody else can figure all that crap out,” he said with a

Read More

Race and gender rhetoric is the perfect cover for corporate misdeeds

Every ruling class sustains a myth to legitimate its rule. What distinguishes America’s corporate elite and its legitimating myth — wokeness and endless self-flagellation about “equity” — is a galling dishonesty married to rapacious greed. For a stark illustration, consider the financial giant Citigroup. In September, as protests and race riots gripped the nation, Citi published a study claiming that racism has cost the United States $16 trillion. The bank’s then-vice chairman, Raymond McGuire, contributed a pained and pious introduction. Citigroup also announced Jane Fraser as its new CEO in September, making her the first female boss of a major Wall Street bank. Thus, as progressives applauded yet another corporate entry into the register of social justice, it went mostly

Read More

Illinois begins offering COVID-19 vaccine to people with health conditions Thursday, but most Chicago-area counties will not. Here’s why.

People ages 16 to 64 with the following conditions may be eligible for vaccines Thursday: cancer, chronic kidney disease, pulmonary diseases, smoking, diabetes, heart conditions, solid organ transplant, obesity, pregnancy, sickle cell disease and disabilities. There are an estimated 3.2 million people in Illinois in that group.

Read More